Why do mountain bike helmets have visors?

Why do mountain bike helmets have visors

As we continue to uncover the fascinating world of mountain bike helmets and their game-changing features, one element might linger in your head – visors! Why do mountain bike helmets have visors? In this detailed article, we’ll delve into the science behind why helmets need visors.

We’ll also explore the various options available for you and what features make a visor more adaptable to different riding situations. Let’s dive in.

The Purpose of Visors

Why do riders need visors? The primary purpose of visors on mountain bike helmets is to provide protection and enhance the overall riding experience for cyclists. These visors, typically made of durable materials such as plastic or polycarbonate, are designed to shield the rider’s face and eyes from various elements encountered while biking on rugged terrain. Let’s have a look at the specific roles visors play below:

Sunlight and Glare Protection

A key function of visors is to shield your eyes from direct sunlight and reduce glare. When biking, especially in sunny weather or on open trails, the visor acts as a barrier, blocking the harsh rays of the sun from directly hitting the eyes. This protection allows riders to maintain clear visibility, reducing eye strain and enhancing overall safety. The same level of protection can be achieved when wearing goggles. However, there are some limitations with goggles and we will discuss them shortly.

Debris and Dust Shielding

Mountain biking often involves traversing through muddy trails, forests, and rough terrains where dust, debris, and small particles can be kicked up into the air. The visor acts as a shield, preventing these elements from directly hitting the rider’s face. It helps in keeping the eyes clear, reducing the chances of distractions and potential eye injuries.

The Purpose of Visors

Rain and Moisture Protection

Weather conditions can change rapidly during a mountain biking adventure. In wet environments, having a visor can significantly improve the riding experience. The visor helps to deflect raindrops away from the rider’s face, enhancing visibility and preventing water from directly obstructing the rider’s view.

Branch and Ledge Clearance

In densely wooded areas or technical trails with low-hanging branches, the visor provides an additional level of protection. It acts as a buffer, deflecting branches or other obstacles away from the rider’s face to minimize the risk of injuries.

Enhanced Focus and Concentration

By reducing direct exposure to sunlight, glare, and elements, visors contribute to improved focus and concentration during rides. Unobstructed visibility allows riders to keep their attention on the trail and quickly react to any obstacles or changes in terrain, leading to a safer and more enjoyable riding experience.

Reduce Eye Strain and Fatigue

Visors on mountain bike helmets play a crucial role in reducing eye strain and fatigue, thus enhancing overall comfort during mountain biking. By blocking direct sunlight and reducing glare, visors minimize the strain placed on the eyes from intense brightness and reflections. This allows you to maintain clearer vision, focus on the trail, and avoid squinting, all of which contribute to reduced eye fatigue.

In addition, by providing a shaded environment for the eyes, visors create a more comfortable riding experience, allowing bikers to enjoy longer rides without the discomfort and exhaustion that can occur from prolonged eye strain.

The Disadvantages of Helmet Visors

While helmet visors offer numerous advantages, they may have a few limitations, which will vary among individuals and specific scenarios. It is also worth noting that visors come in different shapes, sizes, and adjustability options to cater to individual preferences and varying riding conditions. Some visors are also removable or adjustable to accommodate different light conditions or to suit a rider’s personal preference.

So when or why would you opt to ride without a visor?

Interference with Goggles or Eyewear

If you prefer to wear goggles or specific eyewear, helmet visors can sometimes interfere with the proper fit and positioning of these accessories. The visor and eyewear might not align perfectly, leading to discomfort, reduced stability, or compromised functionality of the goggles or eyewear.

Restricted Peripheral Vision

One key disadvantage of helmet visors is the potential to limit peripheral vision. Visors can obstruct the rider’s field of vision when looking to the sides, especially when riding in technical terrain that requires frequent scanning of the surrounding environment. This restricted peripheral vision can hinder situational awareness and increase the risk of missing hazards or obstacles.

Increased Wind Resistance

The addition of a visor on a helmet can create additional wind resistance. This might increase the strain on the rider, particularly during high-speed descents or rides in windy conditions. The increased wind resistance may impact aerodynamics, making it slightly more challenging to maintain speed and overall efficiency.

Reduced Ventilation

Helmet visors can impede proper ventilation and airflow to the rider’s face. In hot and humid conditions, reduced ventilation can contribute to discomfort, perspiration, and impaired heat dissipation. This can lead to increased sweat accumulation and potential fogging of eyewear, causing further vision hindrance.

The Disadvantages of Helmet Visors

Weight and Helmet Balance

The longer or bulkier helmet visors can add weight to the front of the helmet. This additional weight may affect the helmet’s balance and overall fit, potentially causing discomfort or pressure points during extended rides. You may need to adjust the helmet fit or straps to find a comfortable balance.

Despite these disadvantages, it’s essential to note that the impact of these drawbacks can vary depending on personal preferences, riding conditions, and the specific design of the helmet visor. Moreover, some disadvantages can be mitigated by selecting helmets with adjustable visors or opting for removable visor options.

Visor customization and Adjustability

How can we customize helmet visors to mitigate the above limitations and accommodate the unique needs and riding styles of different mountain bikers?

· Adjustable Visor Angle: Modern helmets have adjustable visor angles to allow riders to fine-tune the position of the visor to suit their specific preferences and riding conditions. This flexibility enables riders to find a balance between sun and glare protection while maintaining optimal visibility and minimizing any interference with their field of vision.

· Using Removable Visors: Some helmets feature removable visors, allowing individuals to decide whether to use a visor depending on the riding conditions. By having the option to remove the visor entirely, riders can eliminate any potential drawbacks associated with it, such as wind resistance or compromised ventilation. This adaptability caters to the diverse needs and preferences of riders.

· Visor Length Options: Customization can involve offering visor length options to cater to different riding styles and personal preferences. Shorter visors may provide less obstruction, promote better peripheral vision, and reduce wind resistance, while longer visors offer increased sun and debris protection. By providing choices in visor length, riders can select the option that fits their specific needs.

· Compatibility with Eyewear: Invest in visors that are compatible with various types of eyewear, such as goggles or sunglasses to minimize interference. Some visors are designed with specific cut-outs or contours to accommodate eyewear frames. Such will help you achieve a secure and comfortable fit without compromising the effectiveness of either the visor or eyewear.

Visors vs. Googles

Most helmets use removable visors so you can always replace them or mount your more stylish goggles. But is that advisable? Most riders complain of poor visibility, especially on the edges while wearing goggles. As such, a visor is the most suitable for riding on the highway or on a busy driveway.

On the contrary, goggles are a fantastic idea when riding off-road, motocross, or enduro. You need more airflow because it tends to get hotter. And in this case, they will easily allow air in. Moreover, with goggles, you will never get foggy irrespective of the weather. On such terrain, you also don’t have to worry about incoming cars or pedestrian traffic. So the side-view is not your major focus. You just need to maintain the track in front of your bike and avoid hitting dangerous obstacles.

In Conclusion

Through this exploration, we have uncovered the intricate dance between aerodynamics, sun protection, debris shielding, and customizable features. So why do mountain bike helmets have visors? Well, the primary purpose of visors on mountain bike helmets is to offer protection against sunlight, glare, debris, rain, and other environmental elements. By providing this protection, visors contribute to enhanced visibility, reduced eye strain, and improved safety for mountain bikers, boosting their overall riding experience across different terrains and weather conditions.

Armed with this knowledge, you can now make informed choices, ensuring your mountain biking experiences are not only thrilling but also safe and comfortable. So, go forth, fellow adventurer, equipped with the power of visors, and conquer those trails with confidence and style!

70 thoughts on “Why do mountain bike helmets have visors?”

  1. I’m not a mountain biker, but I can see where visors would be very helpful. I have also noticed that a great number of the cyclists that ride around my area have very fancy helmets with good visors and goggles to avoid eyestrain and glare.  It’s understandable that visors would increase wind resistance, but I didn’t realize that it would interfere with peripheral vision, which seems pretty important to me when you’re riding on the road with cars and such. I’m not sure if this is a great problem with mountain biking.  I really found this article. Very interesting and I’m glad I read it.

    Deedee

    Reply
    • Hi, Dierdre, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      It’s great to hear about the benefit of the article, too.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  2. Hi there.  Very great article about why mountain bike helmets have visors.  I was always wondering about the ventilation during the hot days of summer.  So I can see from your article that indeed, they can get foggy which makes it harder for the biker.  I am not a mountain biker but it is always nice to learn about things that others do.  Thank you for sharing!

    Reply
    • Hi, Carole, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      It’s great to hear about the benefit of the article, too.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  3. Mountain bike helmets come with visors to make your ride more enjoyable and safe. They’re handy for blocking out the sun, rain, or any trail obstacles that might come your way.

     Personally, I find visors on these helmets to be a thoughtful addition, providing both comfort and protection when you’re out on the trails.

    Reply
    • Hi, Jake Devins. Thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      Yes, there is a lot to have in mind. And in my opinion, it works all together. Safety is always the base, but more is needed.

      Yes, it is very important. It styles the helmets a style, too.

      It’s great to hear about the benefit of the article, too.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  4. Hi! and thank you for a most informative post! I can’t see any more uses for the visors than the ones listed here 🙂 I’m just curious if you know when and how the first helmets were made ? And what they looked like they looked ? 

    I really enjoyed reading this post, thanks again.

    Reply
    • Hi, Jonah, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      It is about where you decide that the first helmet was made. The firsts looked like hairnet, and the style was centuries ago. It was so open and not a good defense if the head got a know. Mainly leather, can we say?

      So I would use ca 1975, when it was more like we know now. And much more defense for the head. The brand Bell was at the forefront of the development and used materials like polystyrene and rigid polycarbonate.

      Unfortunate was the helmets more thought before for a pro cycler, which was understandable. But it was rare to use it for others. 

      It’s great to hear about the benefit of the article, too.

      Reply
  5. hey!

    thanksfor the article on mountain bike helmets! really enjoyed learning about why they have visors. 🙂

    i’m not a hardcore biker, but i tried one of those helmets once when i borrowed my friend’s mountain bike. the visor came in handy blocking the sun and keeping dust outta my face. made the ride more chill.

    also, never thought about the rain protection angle. good to know they’re not just for show.

    what’s your take on helmet visors vs. goggles? i’m curious which one you prefer. thx again! 🙂

    Reply
    • Hi, Matias, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      It depends on where I am.

      Off roads, I choose the goggles. Both because I will see the road in front of me very well. But too, as a defense for my eyes

      if I fall for some reason. I don’t want to get dust or stones in my eyes, for example. After all, you are usually off-road in gravel or rough terrain.

      On the road, I prefer a visor.

      It’s great to hear about the benefit of the article, too.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  6. I don’t ride a bike, but can understand why visors are important.  They protect the wearer in all kinds of weather.  

    The downside is that if it is attached to the helmet, it’s a standard size and may not fit snug.  

    However, it is probably down to the preference of the wearer when the best time to wear a helmet visor is.  And also on what kind of terrain.

    So one has to look at the pros and cons and make a decision based on those answers.

    Reply
  7. Hi there,

    Although I have never done mountain biking, I wish to do it one day and after reading this post visors will be a must item that I will carry. To be honest, I thought it was just a trend and styling purpose, but here I learned there were so many benefits to it. The explanation of when to wear goggles and visors was also helpful.

    Thanks for the post. From this article, I gained a deeper understanding of the use of a visor.

    Reply
    • Hi, Manisha, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      It is not a stylist, as you find out. But when you can have stylish and important things with safety in mind, it is a kind of win-win position!

      It’s great to hear about the benefit of the article, too.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  8. Today I learned that visors are available for bike helmets. I only ever though they were for motorcycle helmets and the like. What a great article describing the differences of helmet visors and the various applications. Would you recommend these for ATV rides as well? I’d love to know your thoughts.

    Great content, keep up the good work!

    Reply
    • Hi, JakeZachary, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      No, for ATV rides, I would use motorcycle helmets. There is more power and other things closer to the motorcycle, so I would use the motorcycle helmets.

      It’s great to hear about the benefit of the article, too.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  9. Thanks for your detailed article on why do mountain bike helmets have visors.
    I learned it is to offer protection against sunlight, glare, rain, debris and other things.  I never thought about it in such detail before but often wondered what would a small visor on my helmet even do.

    Your article has clearly explained this and the benefits in having the visor on the helmet.

    I will keep my visor on my bike helmet. Thanks so much for your detailed analysis.

    Reply
    • Hi, John, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      It’s great to hear about the benefit of the article, too.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  10. I am not a mountain biker, however, after reading this post and watching the video I’ve gained some insight about visors on the helmets and the challenges that mountain bikers face. So, is this a situation in which each biker would need to choose according to his or her on needs?

    Reply
    • Hi, Lonnie Webster, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      Yes, if you get this challenge, the visors play an essential part. In the mountains, you are often located where things can change quickly. For example, if you turn to the right and there is the sun directly in front of you, or the surface is dry, and, dust and even stones can come.

      In a situation like that, I would always, after my experience, choose to use it. 

      It’s great to hear about the benefit of the article, too.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  11. I enjoyed reading this. I love learning about the reason for things. As my degree is in Civil Engineering, I just love to learn about how things are built and the reasons for particular features – this article has that sort of stuff in spades.

    I wonder then, with regard to your list of disadvantages, what mitigation measures are there to address them?

    Reply
    • Hi, Simon and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      The best way to reduce the disadvantage is to use these 4 points I mentioned. Adjustable Visor Angle: Using removable Lenses is the best way, in my opinion and experience, to use visor length options and compatibility with eyewear.

      Most helmets use removable visors; having that has many benefits, as you can see.

      It’s great to hear about the benefit of the article, too.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  12. Hi Sports Send

    What an information. Indeed armed with this information you can make better choices. Looking at what protection these visors provide, if I was in charge of this biking sport I would introduce visors as a must for one to participate in the sport. It would be a safety requirement.  Protection of eyes can’t be over- emphasized.

    I like the structure of your article including images in the article. Thank you so much

    Richard

     

    Reply
    • Hi, Richard, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      Yes, we need to protect the head as much as possible, both the brain, eyes, and other parts.

      It’s great to hear about the benefit of the article, too.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  13. Hello there! I appreciate your informative post; it was quite enlightening. I can’t think of any additional uses for the visors beyond those mentioned here 🙂 I’m simply curious about the origins of the first helmets – when and how were they initially made? Additionally, I’d love to know what they looked like. Thanks once again for the enjoyable read!

    Reply
    • Hi, Leonardo Vicari, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      About the first helmets. Like I said in a other comment with this post:

      “It is about where you decide that the first helmet was made. The firsts looked like hairnet, and the style was centuries ago. It was so open and not a good defense if the head got a know. Mainly leather, can we say?

      So I would use ca 1975, when it was more like we know now. And much more defense for the head. The brand Bell was at the forefront of the development and used materials like polystyrene and rigid polycarbonate.

      Unfortunate was the helmets more thought before for a pro cycler, which was understandable. But it was rare to use it for others. “

      It’s great to hear about the benefit of the article, too.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  14. Hey, interesting article. I never considered why they use visors on the helmet.  Blocking peripheral vision seems like it would be a major drawback.  Glasses and goggles can do that too, but the visors are much larger and less adjustable. Maybe just a good helmet and a solid pair of sunglasses? Not sure, a lot to consider here. 

    Reply
    • Hi, Ben, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      Yes, it is tough when you suddenly get so strong sunlight that you can´t see in front of you. You can use both, but I prefer Goggles, feel it fit better or sit better on my face. 

      You have all kinds of sunglasses too, but these two solutions are a bit question of taste. The most important to have is on the face to protect the face. And, of course, to not get suddenly blinded by the sun.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  15. Great article highlighting the multifaceted role of mountain bike helmet visors! The detailed breakdown of their functions, from sun and glare protection to debris shielding, provides a comprehensive understanding of their importance in enhancing the overall riding experience.

    The section on visor customization and adjustability is insightful. It’s fantastic to see helmet designs evolving to cater to individual preferences. How have mountain bikers responded to these customizable options?

    Really enjoyed it! thx

    Reply
    • Hi, Nabil, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  16. Thank you for this detailed article! I always wondered what the visor was used for on the bike helmet, but now I know. Being that the visor is so small, I didn’t think it actually served a purpose. I could now see the benefits of a visor due to the fact that it will help with keeping debris like branches out of your face. Also, how it helps reduce eye strain since it helps protect from the sun. Im not sure if I would like to wear goggles while riding but I’ll take that into consideration when looking for a new bike helmet. 

    Reply
    • Hi, itsYonson, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  17. Hi I am an occasional mountain biker and have different helmets for road cycling and off road. I appreciate the need for a visor when mountain biking and use the appropriate headgear for the trip I am about to take. Thank you for spelling out the pros and cons and why you should wear the appropriate headgear for the type of cycle trip you are making, cheers Alan.

    Reply
    • Hi, Alan, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      Very clever to use different helmets. Because there is a massive difference between being on the road, on a mountain, or off the road, you would be interested in this article about the difference between these types of helmets.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  18. Mountain bike helmet visors are like superheroes for riders, right? —shielding from the sun, debris, and even rain! But here’s my twist on it: Do you think the future holds smart visors, maybe with built-in tech to enhance the ride further, or are we sticking to the classic design? Also, thanks for the breakdown on visor pros and cons – it’s like getting the insider’s guide to the superhero’s strengths and weaknesses.

    Reply
    • Hi, Stephanie, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      It is very difficult to say. Yes, there will be a huge development for sure. But maybe will be more differences between pro helmets and others. The speed can be too much in some places, and you are already right now where you need to “slow down” in some areas.

      For example, I know about triathlon, where you cannot cycle at full speed; you can´t go over a special speed limit. The reason is that so many had been injured on that part because they came in on a dangerous seed.

      But I believe too that we will see helmets which offer a lot of things like listening to Storytel, for example.

      Then, the question is, is it good when you are in nature to enjoy it and get in good shape? I think each person needs to answer that for herself.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  19. This is pretty informative. I never really thought about the ventilation and fogging issues that bikers face during hot days. It’s cool to learn about the benefits of having a visor for eye protection. I do wonder though, do all mountain bike helmets come with visors or is it something you have to buy separately? And are there any other safety features that bikers should consider?

    Reply
    • Hi, Raymond, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      Yes, all mountain bike helmets come with visors. The reason is that it is so important for safety reasons. Defense against the sun is very important as it can quickly block your eyes.

      The experience of driving cars and getting suddenly in the eyes with all the difficulties gives us a good idea of why it is so important.

      Imagine when you bike overhill and are on the top of the hill, you have the sun in your eyes at full speed. That can be very dangerous.

      And, of course, you have all the other benefits mentioned in the article.

      There are other essential things to have in mind about safety. We cover it well in this post here.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  20. Thank you for this insightful article.

    I actually wasn’t even aware what the term “visor” referred to until I saw the video, so good job including it — it made the whole discussion much easier to follow.

    As soon as I saw the gentleman put his visor down, the first drawback that came to mind is that it’ll reduce your peripheral vision, so when I read on, I was glad to see that you mentioned it as one of the disadvantages.

    My question is this:

    How easy is it to put the visor down and up while you’re riding your bike? Just like you said, if you’re riding in technical terrain which requires you to keep scanning your surroundings, then you’ll probably need to put it up. If you clear that terrain and move on to a very sunny area, then you’ll probably want to put it down. 

    Is it easy to do that while you’re riding?

    Reply
    • Hi, Yusuf, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      It is easy and very important that it is easy to put the visors up or down.

      As you mentioned, you simply need to change it, sometimes many times.

      When you go downhill, it is very important in most cases to have it up. Because you need to see the trail or where you are biking, and if it is down, it limits what you see. One extra benefit of that, too, is if it is wind, having it up cools you down and has an effect that the sweat doesn´t go down in your eyes. That is a feeling nobody wants.

      But when you go up, many times you want to have the visor down. You don´t get the sun in the eyes, and if it is windy, it will take the dust from the top of your helmet.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  21. It is a long time since I did any mountain biking but I found this article very interesting.  I never did any extreme cycling –  but it was through fairly dense woods with lots of roots and branches to navigate.  We didn’t wear visors.  We wore wrap-around sunglasses with our helmets.  I’m not sure I would like to use a visor as I think I would want clear peripheral vision. From my experience skiing, I much preferred sunglasses to goggles for this very same reason.   However, if I tried a visor, I might change that opinion.  Thanks for a very detailed explanation of why mountain bike helmets have visors.   

    Reply
    • Hi, Elaine, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      I understand you very well and agree on many things like the sunglasses. But I would still use the visor for many reasons. Keep in mind that it is easy to set it up or down after what is best.

      But the reason I have the possibility is, for example, if it rains. It is helpful for the glasses/goggles.

      We bike many times where we can get a lot of dust, even stones, so it degends the eyes.

      One of the most important reasons is that we less get the sun in the eyes like if we are biking up on a hill and suddenly the sun comes. These are things that I had a lot of experience with.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  22. Are there different brands of bike helmets that have strong visors?  I do think it depends on the brand and what do they entail.  The visors need to have a strong frame.  They need to be approved. There should be clothes attached, so that they can be cleaned if there is any dirt.   Are those visors available?

    Reply
    • Hi, Anshu, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      It does not depend on the brands but on how you will use the helmets, whether it has a visor. Road bike helmets don´t have it because they would not see as well with it as it narrows the view.

      But it is important for bikers on off-roads. We wrote about it in this article if you like.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  23. Hi there I just had an look at your site and find your topic interesting.

    I do not ride a bike but I can think plain and simply put that you need to protect your eyes from any objects, you just have 1 pair of eyes.

    I find your blog very interesting, there is a lot of good info about visors and why you need to use them.

    Thanks for letting me view your site.

    Reply
    • Hi, Welf Bolke, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  24. For someone who doesn’t ride, I still found this to be very interesting information. I had no idea that there was so much to bike helmets, yet the visors on them! Glad to see you out here preaching safety! 

    What visor would you suggest for someone just starting out? Maybe someone not looking to spend a lot of money? 

    Reply
    • Hi, Connor, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      There are some good helmets with visors here at a budget-friendly price.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  25. You learn something new every day, and for me this was it. Seems there’s more cons than pros with a helmet visor, although the one thing I did like was protection from branches etc. when riding. Might be a good idea for me when I’m on my ride on lawn-mower 😀

    Was checking out some of the other articles on the side, they look very interesting too!

    All the best

    Michelle – Eco TIGA

    Reply
    • Hi, Tiga, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      Well, it depends! Personally, I would have a vision if I were biking off roads. If on the streets, I would not have it.

      But having said that, there are still pros and cons and a thumbnail!

      If I am going downhill, I would not use it. I need a good view, and the visor can limit it.

      But if I am going up the same hill, I would use it. Because the sun can suddenly limit what I see in front of me, so, I want to have it on. So I am not suddenly where the sun blinds me for a second. That had happened!

      Ultimately, it is easy to set it up or down, so it is not so much a problem.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  26. I’ve been needing someone to just give me the full over view on this! I also went on the mountain biking helmets on amazon, and it is perfect. It tells you the ratings and the reviews etc. thank you. One question though, is it a necessity to wear a helmet?

    Reply
    • Hi, Zxrxh_54, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      In my opinion and experience, yes, there is no question about having a helmet! It is so important to think all the time about safety; part of it is to be clever when you are biking.

      The helmet is the easiest safety thing, but it is also important to defend your head. All research has shown how dangerous a knock on the head is. A helmet can help you with that, even though it is far from 100% defense.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  27. Hi there! I enjoyed reading this article about why mountain bike helmets have visors. 

    It’s amazing how such a simple feature can protect from debris and weather conditions, and even enhance performance on challenging terrains. 

    This piece has certainly given me a new appreciation for the design and functionality of mountain biking gear. Thanks for sharing!

    Best wishes,

    Idem

    Reply
    • Hi, Idem, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  28. I just went through your article on why mountain bike helmets have visors, and it was enlightening. The comprehensive breakdown of the protective roles of visors, like shielding eyes from sunlight and glare, blocking dust and debris, and protecting against rain and low-hanging branches, really highlights their importance in mountain biking​​​​​​​.

    I’m curious, though, about how visors perform in different weather conditions, like extreme sunlight or heavy rain. Do they offer sufficient visibility and protection in such varied environments? Also, how do adjustments or customizations of visors enhance their effectiveness in these different scenarios?

    Reply
    • Hi, Corey, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      Using visors doesn´t mean that they defend you perfectly against rain, sun, or other things. But the difference between using it or not is clearly in favor of visors.

      But I stress that here we are talking about mountain riding. I would not use it on the road because it narrows the view we need to have there.

      The defense against the sun and rain greatly helps, so I would always prefer to have it. Exactly how much is more difficult to say. But the difference between using it or not is clear.

      I, personally, would also invest in visors, which are designed with specific cut-outs or contours to accommodate eyewear frames. Such will help you achieve a secure and comfortable fit without compromising the visor’s or eyewear’s effectiveness.

      But having said that, the other types are good too!

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  29. Hello!  I have had the pleasure on reviewing your coverage of visors on mountain-bike helmets.  I enjoyed reading through your content.  Though not a cyclist myself, I have done a lot of downhill skiing in the Rocky Mountains and your point about glare is absolutely spot on.  Glare can be a dangerous issue in a sport where speed and unfamiliar terrain can have untoward and, sometimes, extremely dangerous consequences.  

    Grant Rayner

    Reply
    • Hi, Grant Rayner, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      Yes, the glare can be dangerous, so it is good advice to be as prepared with this visitor as possible. Just in case!

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  30. Hello and thanks for this informative article!  Towards the end of the article, you mentioned that goggles don’t get foggy no matter the weather conditions. Do visors have more problems with getting foggy then? Or are they generally well-designed enough to avoid getting foggy as well?

    This makes me want to hit the trail!

    Reply
    • Hi, GJessica, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      Yes, you can do it, but you need a helmet with good ventilation. It is better to say that it is crucial because this is all about the airflow, so the goggles won´t be foggy.

      I wrote about the importance of ventilation, and you can see the article here if you want. I recommend you do that.

      The goggles are too different, so getting goggles that are well-ventilated helps, too.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  31. I just read your post about visors on mountain bike helmets. I didn’t realize how much they affect visibility and comfort, especially in different riding conditions. There are many things here that I would never have taken into consideration when buying a new bike helmet.

    When I wear my bike helmet, I always find that my forehead sweats a lot which can be really frustrating at times. I often have to lift the visor and I find the rush of air cools me down. Is there a visor you could recommend for this kind of issue?

    Thanks for the information. Nice article.

    Chris

    Reply
    • Hi, Chris Towers, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  32. While the article thoroughly explains the benefits and limitations of visors on mountain bike helmets, I’m curious about the advancements in visor technology over recent years. 

    How have these visors evolved in terms of materials, design, and functionality to better suit the dynamic needs of modern mountain bikers? Specifically, are there any innovative features that have been introduced to address the common issues like wind resistance and peripheral vision obstruction while maintaining or enhancing the primary protective functions?

    Reply
    • Hi, Sonia, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      Over the years, mountain bike helmet visors have evolved significantly in response to modern mountain bikers’ dynamic needs. Regarding materials, advancements in lightweight yet durable compounds, such as high-grade polycarbonates and reinforced plastics, have replaced older, heavier materials.

      The reason is that it ensures rider comfort and enhances overall helmet performance.

      The design of mountain bike helmet visors has shifted towards a more aerodynamic and streamlined profile. This not only reduces wind resistance but also contributes to a sleeker aesthetic. Additionally, improved adjustability features allow bikers to customize the visor angle, catering to varying light conditions and riding preferences.

      Functionality has seen considerable enhancements to meet the demands of modern mountain biking. Many visors now incorporate integrated ventilation systems, promoting airflow and reducing heat build-up during intense rides. Some models also feature quick-release mechanisms for easy removal and attachment, accommodating the diverse preferences of riders.

      Moreover, incorporating advanced technology, such as anti-fog coatings and UV protection, has become commonplace. These innovations improve visibility and safety, especially in challenging weather conditions. Overall, the evolution of mountain bike helmet visors reflects a commitment to optimizing safety, comfort, and performance for the ever-changing landscape of mountain biking.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  33. I enjoyed your article regarding the helmets and visors. I wanted to ask your thoughts regarding e-scooters/ bikes. Ilive in busy urban area where the risk for injuries is high. Regarding helmets would you recommend these helmets for urban purposes when you consider the speed that e-bikes/scooters can reach?
    Asking for my very concerned wife

    Reply
    • Hi, Bernard Barisic.

      No, I don´t recommend using it in this area. The reason is that it can interfere with peripheral vision on the road. So I recommend highly that use the visors only off roads.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  34. Those visors on mountain bike helmets are more than just a cool addition—they’re all about keeping riders safe. They shield faces and eyes from branches, sunlight, and dirt during rides.

    How do these visors specifically protect riders from the potential dangers of low-hanging branches and debris and what design aspects or materials make these visors effective in safeguarding against sunlight and impacts?

    Are there any advancements in visor technology or additional features planned to enhance rider safety further?

    Reply
    • Hi, Bushra, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      The visors act as a buffer, deflecting branches or other obstacles away from the rider’s face to minimize the risk of injuries if you get hit by low-hanging branches.

      About the sun, a key function of visors is to shield your eyes from direct sunlight and reduce glare. When biking, especially in sunny weather or on open trails, the visor acts as a barrier, blocking the sun’s harsh rays from directly hitting the eyes. This protection allows riders to maintain clear visibility, reducing eye strain and enhancing safety.

      Like other parts of the helmets, the visors are constantly developing. But we need to see what will come strong next.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply
  35. Hi, I’m confused. I read with interest your article about visors. I noticed in the pictures in the article, that none of the riders are wearing what I thought a visor is. Maybe I don’t know what a visor is. I think of a visor as something that at least partially, if not fully covers your face. Based on what you’ve written, the way you described both the advantages and disadvantages, you seem to be describing what I picture in my mind’s eye. Yet, as I said, none of the riders in the pictures are wearing one. What did I miss?

    Bob

    Reply
    • Hi, Bob Lynch, and thank you.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      You have full-face helmets in mind. Bike helmets with visors are completely another thing!

      Full-face and bike helmets with visors are two distinct types of headgear designed for different purposes in the cycling world.

      Full-face helmets are primarily intended for downhill mountain biking, BMX, and other high-impact cycling disciplines. They provide comprehensive protection for the entire head, including the face and chin.

      Full-face helmets prioritize maximum protection, making them ideal for riders who engage in aggressive and high-speed riding.

      On the other hand, bike helmets with visors are more commonly used off-road and for mountain biking.

      Don’t hesitate to contact me to help you with anything else or if you have any questions.

      Reply

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